Co-Dependents Anonymous
1 member 12 Step Groups
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) is a twelve-step program for people who share a common desire to develop functional and healthy relationships.[1][2][3] Co-Dependents Anonymous was founded by Ken and Mary Richardson and the first CoDA meeting attended by 30 people was held October 22, 1986 in Phoenix, Arizona.[3][4] Within four weeks there were 100 people and before the year was up there were 120 groups.[5] CoDA held its first National Service Conference the next year with 29 representatives from seven states.[3]: 567 [5] CoDA has stabilized at about a thousand meetings in the US, and with meetings active in 60 other countries and dozens online that can be reached at www.coda.org.[6]
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Clutterers Anonymous
1 member 12 Step Groups
Clutterers Anonymous (CLA) is a twelve-step program for people who share a common problem with accumulation of clutter. CLA says that it focuses on the underlying issues made manifest by unnecessary physical and emotional clutter, rather than hints, tips and lectures.[1] CLA had active meetings in about 70 cities in 24 states in the US, and several in England, Germany, and Iceland, as of 2011.[2][3] CLA Tradition 3 states, "The only requirement for CLA membership is a desire to stop cluttering."[2][4] Clutterers Anonymous replaces "powerless over alcohol" in the First Step of the Twelve Steps originally developed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) with "powerless over our clutter."[5] CLA was founded in May 1989 in Simi Valley, California.[4] Some members of CLA describe the inability to let go of objects as a consequence of spiritual emptiness.[4]
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Adult Children of Alcoholics
1 member 12 Step Groups
Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA or ACOA) founded circa 1973 is a fellowship of people who desire to recover from the effects of growing up in an alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional family. ACA membership has few formal requirements. ACA does not accept any outside contributions and is supported entirely by donations from its members. The organization is not related to any particular religion and has no political affiliation. Tony A.[1] was among its co-founders and is the author of The Laundry List,[2][3] 12 steps for adult children of alcoholics (known as "Tony A's 12 Steps")[4], The Problem,[5] which are all published in his book, The Laundry List: The ACOA Experience (co-authored with Dan F.)[6]
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Workaholics Anonymous
1 member 12 Step Groups
Workaholics Anonymous (WA) is a twelve-step program founded circa 1983 for people identifying themselves as "powerless over compulsive work, worry, or activity" including, but not limited to, workaholics–including overworkers and those who suffer from unmanageable procrastination or work aversion. Anybody with a desire to stop working compulsively is welcome at a WA meeting. Unmanageability can include compulsive work in housework, hobbies, fitness, or volunteering as well as in paid work. Anyone with a problematic relationship with work is welcomed.[1] Workaholics Anonymous is considered an effective program for those who need its help. In 1983, one of the first formal efforts to create a fellowship around work addiction recovery began in New York when a corporate financial planner and a school teacher met. They formed Workaholics Anonymous to stop working compulsively themselves and to help others who suffered from the disease of workaholism. In their first meetings, spouses joined them and in retrospect were the first Work-Anon group, seeking recovery for family and friends of workaholics. Workaholics Anonymous is an international fellowship of over fifty in-person, phone, and online meetings with over an estimated thousand active members. WA's World Service Office has a Menlo Park central address.[2] WA has developed its own literature, most notably the Workaholics Anonymous Book of Recovery,[3] but also uses the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) books Alcoholics Anonymous[4] and Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions.[5]
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Underearners Anonymous
1 member 12 Step Groups
Underearners Anonymous (UA) is a twelve-step program founded in 2005 for men and women who have come together to overcome what they call "underearning". Underearning is not just the inability to provide for oneself monetarily including the inability to provide for one's needs presently and in the future but also the general inability to express one's capabilities and competencies. The underlying premise of Underearners Anonymous is that underearning is a kind of mental disorder regarding the use of time, rather like the alcoholic's self-destructive compulsion to drink to excess. Indeed, members of UA sometimes refer to themselves as "time drunks", because they have a propensity to fritter away their time in questionable activities, rather than pursuing constructive goals. This parallel with alcoholism has led the fellowship to appropriate much of the apparatus of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), including the Twelve Steps, regular meetings to share their "experience, strength, and hope," and sponsorship. UA suggests studying AA literature to gain a better understanding of addictive diseases. Specifically, UA endorses the use of the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions[2] and Alcoholics Anonymous[3] (also known as the "Big Book"). UA uses additional tools, such as keeping written records of how one spends one's time, "possession consciousness" (the disposal of "what no longer serves us"), Goal pages which is the writing down of one's goals, measuring progress and rewarding achievement and the avoidance of "debting" (unsecured borrowing). They also advocate "action meetings" in which members peer-counsel others about earning-related issues, and "action partnerships" in which members encourage each other to complete earning-related tasks.
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Sexual Recovery Anonymous
1 member 12 Step Groups
Sexual Recovery Anonymous (SRA) founded circa 1993 is one of several twelve-step programs for the treatment of sexual addiction based on the original Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous.[1] SRA takes its place among various 12-step groups that seek recovery from sexual addiction: Sex Addicts Anonymous, Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous, Sexual Compulsives Anonymous and Sexaholics Anonymous. The New York-based group has meetings in several states.[2] Collectively these groups are referred to as "S" groups since all their acronyms begin with that letter.[citation needed] There is a related group called SRA-ANON for spouses, relatives, friends, and significant others of SRA members.[3] This group is analogous to Al-Anon for family members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). SRA was founded around 1993 and is said to be a "progressive offshoot" of Sexaholics Anonymous (SA) and is said to be "far more diverse" with a strong presence of women, African Americans, Asians, and members of the LGBT community.[4] SRA also differs from SA by allowing sexual relations between two people in a “committed relationship”, while SA only allows a heterosexual spouse as an acceptable partner.[5][6]
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